New World Realty



Posted by New World Realty on 3/11/2018

If you have ever wanted to get rid of all of your stuff and start over, youíre not alone. Often, we get tired of the same old same in our own homes, and fail to see the potential inside of it. The key to loving your home is often not what is in it, but how you make use of whatís in it. Thereís so many ways that you can make the home that you feel so-so about turn into a home that you love. Hereís some very powerful tips to help you decorate with intention and style. We know that youíll love your home again after trying out some of these tips: Decorate For Function Not Looks Function is one of the most important words that youíll use when it comes to the interior design of your home. Some questions you may ask are: What purpose does this room serve? What purpose does this item serve? Does this couch/artwork/chair make you happy? A room could be the most pristinely decorated room you have ever seen, but if it doesnít serve some kind of a purpose, you can write it off as wasted space inside of your home. If something doesnít serve a purpose, especially if that purpose is making you happy, then itís time to say goodbye to certain things inside of your home. Only One Piece Of Furniture Should Stand Out In Every Room One key piece of decorating advice is for you to have one simple focal point in each room. Thereís no need for a fish tank, a loud orange couch and a giant painting all in the same room. Give each and every item thatís important to you its due space. Thatís not to say one painting is enough in your living room, but use your judgement when it comes to what you want to stand out and where. If a room is too busy, the overwhelming look takes away from the room and all of the items in it. You donít want pieces of furniture and artwork all competing for the attention of those who are within the room. Lighting Should Be Balanced Maybe youíre unhappy with your home because you have very little natural light in your home. Thereís ways you could add some natural light through construction, but it probably isnít necessary. Use the rule that each room should have four sources of light counting windows, overhead lights, lamps and even wall mounted lights. This will keep the rooms in your home balanced with light. When the room is brighter, youíll be happier, even without access to tons of natural light.





Posted by New World Realty on 12/14/2015

Many homes in our area have stories to tell. If you live in an older home, you may want to know its hidden secrets. You may have wondered who slept in your bedroom or when the home was actually built. Your home holds many clues to its history and its prior owners. With some detective work you will be well on your way to uncovering your home's hidden past. Here are some hints to get you started. Gather Information In order to get started you will need to uncover all of the information you have, you will want to gather your deed and title paperwork. Make note of the first owner, year built, and the year the original owner sold it. You will also want to know the names of all the owners, as well as the years they bought and sold the property. All of this information may not be available on your deed but you will be able to find it at town hall or the registry of deeds. You may find clues in the names of owners and years owned. Pay attention to details and look for clues. Some clues to the history of the home may be: a family that owned the home for a long time, multiple property turnovers and inconsistencies in property or land descriptions. Tackling the Records Wading through the mountains of information may be difficult but don't get discouraged. Information about your homeís owners will most likely be contradictory. Census records dating back to the year your house was built are likely available at your public library, a nearby university or your local historical society or museum. Review census rosters from the year closest to the one your house was built. Census records from the 1800s and early 1900s have lots of fun and interesting information and often include the names of all those living in a household at the time, their ages, occupations, places of birth, and sometimes more. You may also want to search for census data on the U.S. Census website. Getting Help Some of the language on deeds and title paperwork can be hard to understand put older language in the mix and it can be even more confusing. Ask friends who are lawyers, title-company employees or experts in historical documents for help. You can also turn to the internet for help. Use the internet to dig up any information you can find about the families who lived in your home, as well as the surrounding streets, neighborhoods, and landmarks. If prior owners of your home are relatives you can use genealogy web sites for research. Getting a Feel for the Times Read through newspapers from the year your house was built. You will start to get a sense of the historical times. Keep notes on everything you find that mentions your house and its occupants. In those times local papers covered social news of all kindsódinner parties, haying trips, visits from out-of-town relativesóin addition to chronicling everything from world events to weather. They often covered construction of new homes, and may offer you information on where the builders got the materials used to build your house, why they made certain design decisions, and more. More Information For more information regarding researching homes you may want to try some of the books listed. American Shelter: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Home, by Lester Walker, Overlook Press, 1981 How Old is This House? by Hugh Howard, Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1989 House Styles in America, by James C. Massey and Shirley Maxwell, Penguin Studio, 1996 Old American House, by Henry Lionel Williams and Ottalie K. Williams, Bonanza Books, 1957 A Field Guide to American Houses, by Virginia and Lee McAlester, Random House, 1984